Mystery Skype – Learning about Geography and the world around us!

For the past few weeks my class has been taking part in a mystery skype game with another class somewhere in the world. Mystery Skype is a game that is usually played live where two classes skype and have to ask yes/no questions and try and find where the other class is in the world. It encourages children to learn about geography and use their skills to think of questions to try and guess where the other class is.

Due to time difference we have been playing a slight variation of the game. As a live game was impossible we have been sending daily video messages asking and answering questions. It is incredible how excited the children are everyday and how engaged, one student brought in a world map from home and some have even brought atlases and small maps.

It only takes about 5 minutes and we have it as part of our IPC lessons or homeroom time. Children do most of the work at home where they discuss what questions are best to ask the other class. Google classroom helps here, as children can communicate with each other and I have shared a document with the whole class. Two people are in charge of editing an online document where we register the date, questions asked, answers, etc, this helps us keep track of the game.

For our first try participating in a Mystery Skype the whole experience has been excellent, the whole class enjoyed their learning and it was great to see how much they learnt from the whole experience!

Looking forward to trying it again as well as taking part in a live Mystery skype!

KAHOOT!

kahoot-logoRecently we have introduced Kahoot into some of our lessons. During our year group planning sessions we sometimes find it difficult to come up with new and exciting ways to engage our students, especially lesson starters and plenaries, but we are always looking for technological ways to engage students and enhance their learning.

Kahoot has proven to be an excellent tool for student engagement. It is so simple to use and the students don’t even have to log in, they simply access the Kahoot Quiz via a ‘Game Pin’. The amount of Quizzes already available make it a breeze to find something useful and if not then you can always duplicate a quiz to edit it or make one of your own from scratch!

Going back to student engagement, it really is genius! Students are excited about the whole ‘game’ feel that Kahoot has, the competition with leader boards and just how fun it is! Now, what about the education value from a teachers perspective?

Well, we have only used Kahoot a few times, but the features it has for teachers make it a useful formative assessment tool. As a teacher you can access all the data about each quiz you have played with a class. The results are downloaded as an excel document where you can see the names of the students that participated and all the questions they faced in the quiz. You can also save the results to your Google Drive.

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This is then broken down further, the results will show each question, how students answered and if they got the question correct or not. You can then access individual questions to further analyse the results where you can see the percentage of students that answered the question correctly and how long they took to decide on an answer.

Global view of student names and the questions, showing whether they answered correctly or not:

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Breakdown of individual questions:

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In the above question it is clear that a high percentage of the class could not answer the question correctly, this helps in identifying areas that need to be addressed.

We will definitely be using Kahoot in the future and I recommend you try it in your classroom if you haven’t done so already!